The Curious Meaning of “God”

April 8, 2015By Mark D. Roberts

Genesis 1:1-2
 
I began yesterday’s Life for Leaders devotion by pointing to the introduction of Pip in Charles Dickens’s novel, Great Expectations. Pip appears in the first paragraph of the novel, in which he explains the derivation of his strange name. Though officially Philip Pirrip, the boy couldn’t say his proper name when learning to talk. Instead, he referred to himself as Pip, and the nickname stuck.
The very first verse of Genesis introduces us to God. The word “God,” which serves here almost as God’s name, is rather like the name “Pip” in that it raises some interesting questions. Though we don’t see what’s peculiar about “God” in English translations, in the original Hebrew the oddness stands out plainly.

The Story of God

April 7, 2015By Mark D. Roberts

Today’s reading: Genesis 1:1-2
 
Sometimes great stories introduce the protagonist in the very first paragraph. In Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations, for example, we are immediately introduced to Pip, the central figure of the novel, and we learn why he has such an odd name. Yet, other stories wait for some time before the protagonist appears. In Les Misérables by Victor Hugo, Jean Valjean does not show up until around page 50 (out of 1200). If you were not familiar with Hugo’s classic story, while reading the first chapters you might think the Bishop of Digne was the main character. As it turns out, he plays a pivotal but relatively small role in the story of Les Misérables, in which Valjean is the main character.
 
The Bible takes a Dickensian approach to its protagonist….

First Impressions

April 6, 2015By Mark D. Roberts

Genesis 1:1-2
 
When was the last time you really wanted to make a good first impression? I experienced this desire a few weeks ago when I journeyed to Holland, Michigan, in order to meet Max De Pree. Max is a legendary leader, beloved mentor, and best-selling author of several books. Leadership Is an Art, Max’s first book, had a marked influence on my own leadership when I read it as a young pastor more than twenty years ago. Thus, I wanted to impress Max as I shared how he had shaped my work as a leader.

God’s Resurrection Power for Us

April 5, 2015By Mark D. Roberts

Ephesians 1:19-20
 
This is Easter Sunday, the day when most Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. (Eastern Orthodox believers celebrate Easter a week later than Westerners.) Today, we focus our celebration on the fact that Jesus shattered the bonds of death as God raised him to new life. The resurrection demonstrates that God’s plan for salvation through the cross actually worked.

The Reality of the Cross

April 4, 2015By Mark D. Roberts

Romans 5:6-8
 
Today is Holy Saturday, the day between the cross and the resurrection of Christ. It’s a day of reflection and waiting. It’s a time to consider further the reality of the cross so as to prepare for the celebration of the resurrection.
 
I will never forget a humorous Holy Saturday conversation that happened between my children when they were young.

Live in Love

April 3, 2015By Mark D. Roberts

Ephesians 5:1-2
 
Today is Good Friday, the day of the year when Christians throughout the world remember the death of Jesus in a special way. In our devotions and private prayers, in our gatherings for worship and communion, and in our sacrificial service to others, we reflect upon what happened to Christ almost 2,000 years ago and what it means for us today. Rightly, we often focus on the difference Christ’s death makes for us personally. Because he died on the cross, we can be forgiven and reconciled to God. Because Jesus died, we can experience life as God meant it to be experienced, both in this age (partially) and in the age to come (completely).
 
I would like to reflect with you on another way in which the death of Jesus transforms our lives, not so much in what we receive as in what we give.

Servant Leadership on Maundy Thursday

April 2, 2015By Mark D. Roberts

John 13:1-38
 
Today is Maundy Thursday according to many strands of Christian tradition. Growing up in a non-liturgical Christian culture, I thought people were calling this day “Monday Thursday,” the silliness of which confirmed my bias against liturgical versions of Christianity. Later, I learned that folks weren’t saying “Monday Thursday” but rather “Maundy Thursday.” Of course, this didn’t help much because I didn’t know the word “Maundy.” Finally, in my twenties, I took a course on church order at Fuller Seminary, where I finally learned the meaning of “Maundy.”

Spy Wednesday and the Unexpected Meaning of Our Work

April 1, 2015By Mark D. Roberts

Matthew 26:6-16
 
When I was a boy, nobody told me today was Spy Wednesday. If they had, I might have been more interested in what happened to Jesus on the Wednesday before his death. After all, what young boy isn’t fascinated by spies? But, in my Christian upbringing, the Wednesday before Easter was simply known as Wednesday. In some traditions it’s called Holy Wednesday, but I doubt that would have engaged my juvenile imagination. No, if they wanted my attention, they should have told me it was Spy Wednesday.