I Am The Bread Of Life

April 17, 2016By Tim Yee

In yesterday’s post I highlighted how Jesus surprised his hearers by saying, “I am the bread.” The Jews of his day were looking for a Messiah who could bring manna like Moses. Jesus did offer literal bread from a supernatural source when he multiplied the loaves and fish. But what he offered most of all was himself. He was the manna from heaven. He was the bread.

Jesus is not only “the bread” but also and specifically the “the bread of life.”

I Am The Bread

April 16, 2016By Tim Yee

When Jesus says, “I am the bread,” he is confirming their hopes that he is the Messiah while challenging them to understand that he is something much more than a problem solver. Instead of saying, “I will give you bread,” he says, “I am the bread.” For those who are seeking something from Jesus, he offers himself instead.

One of the most common mistakes we as leaders can make is wanting the gifts of the Giver more than the Giver of the gifts.

The Light of the World, Part 2

March 20, 2016By Tim Yee

In yesterday’s devotion, I suggested that the candles lit in the temple from the annual Feast of Tabernacles was the backdrop to Jesus claiming, “I am the light of the world.” In fact, because he probably said this on the last day of the festival, Jesus was creating an even more vivid contrast than it appears at first glance.

The Light of the World, Part 1

March 19, 2016By Tim Yee

Throughout John’s gospel, distinctive “I am” statements point toward Jesus’ divinity, centrality, and authority. In John 8:12-20, for example, Jesus says, “I am the light of the world.” What does this mean?

Fruitfulness and Jesus

May 11, 2015By Mark D. Roberts

Before moving on from the command in Genesis 1:28 to be fruitful, I’d like to examine how Jesus uses this language in John 15. There, fruitfulness serves, not in its literal sense, but as a metaphor for a life that is productive for God and his kingdom. According to Jesus, we who believe in him are to “bear much fruit and become [his] disciples” (John 1:8). When we do this, God the Father is glorified.

How do we bear much fruit for the Lord?

Servant Leadership on Maundy Thursday

April 2, 2015By Mark D. Roberts

John 13:1-38
 
Today is Maundy Thursday according to many strands of Christian tradition. Growing up in a non-liturgical Christian culture, I thought people were calling this day “Monday Thursday,” the silliness of which confirmed my bias against liturgical versions of Christianity. Later, I learned that folks weren’t saying “Monday Thursday” but rather “Maundy Thursday.” Of course, this didn’t help much because I didn’t know the word “Maundy.” Finally, in my twenties, I took a course on church order at Fuller Seminary, where I finally learned the meaning of “Maundy.”