Movement as a Spiritual Practice

August 19, 2017By Deidra Riggs

I believe our bodies were made to move — whatever we can move, for as long as we can move it. I feel the sun beat down on my shoulders as I tug at the roots of an obstinate dandelion and I cannot help but thank God for shoulders that move, knees that bend, lungs that expand, and thumbs for grabbing and tugging. All of it comes from God: the sunshine, the dandelions, and the bodies we’ve been given as packaging for our soul. We live, move, and have our being in him alone. When my limbs ache after a weekend of shoveling or digging or reaching or bending, I thank God for the ache and its reminder to me of this gift of movement and presence of God in the midst of it all.

Gravity Problems

June 11, 2017By Tim Yee

In yesterday’s devotion we were challenged by an assertion in Dave Evans’ and Bill Burnett’s book, Designing Your Life to not waste time on the wrong problems but rather to focus on the right ones. They follow this advice by warning us to especially avoid what they call “gravity problems”.

Are You Fixing the Wrong Problem?

June 10, 2017By Tim Yee

Sometimes the problems we focus lots of resources on don’t deserve this time and effort. Wrong problems often disguise themselves as important or urgent when they are rarely both – and often neither. Those we lead deserve our focus to be on the right problems to be addressed instead of the wrong problems that others want us to fix.

What the Great Commission Teaches Us About Talking to Strangers

June 25, 2016By Deidra Riggs

A recent study conducted by the Barna Group found that many evangelical Americans have a difficult time striking up a conversation with people who are different from them. This struggle to communicate with people who are different from us is consistent across the board. The Barna study found that all Americans find it difficult to engage in conversations with people from groups that are different than theirs. However, what’s most striking is the discovery that evangelical Christians appear to struggle more than any other groups in the study.